Article

A multicentered study on management of hypertension and use of antihypertensives for patients undergoing hemodialysis

Author : Mullapudi Gnana Deepika, Gopavaram Lalasa, Sandra Nirosha, Karthik MN, Apoorva Dev

Background: There is a strong relationship between Hypertension (HTN) and Chronic kidney Disease (CKD) .The study aims in assessing the use of antihypertensive in CKD patients. Objective: to observe and analyze the use of antihypertensive for patients undergoing dialysis and to find the prevalence of hypertension in CKD patients along with intradialytic complications. Methodology: A prospective observational study was conducted in the department of nephrology in BGS Gleneagles Hospital and Excel Care Hospital, Bengaluru for a period of 6 months. Results: A total of 123 patients consisting of 85 male (69.10%) and 38 female (30.89%) were enrolled .The most commonly prescribed drugs are Calcium Channel Blockers (CCB) 82(74.54%) and Beta blockers 59(53.63%) and followed by other antihypertensives. The prevalence of HTN in CKD was found to be 95.93%. Fluid overload status 16(13%), hypotension 5(4.06%), hypertension 04(3.25%), breathlessness 3(2.43%), pain at fistula site 02(1.62%), hypoglycemia 02(1.62%), abdominal pain 02(1.62%), weakness, itching and cramps 3(2.43%), and chills, fever and body pains 02(1.62%) were the intradialytic complications observed. Conclusion: From the present study it can be concluded that CCBs are the most commonly prescribed class of antihypertensive. The prevalence of hypertension in CKD seems to follow an increasing trend with increasing age. Special consideration is required for the diagnosis and management of intradialytic complications because such complications could be managed successfully without the need for termination of the dialysis procedure.


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